ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York, July 7 – 30, 2015

Advanced Master Remix
ICP-Bard MFA 2015
Curated by Joanna Lehan

A group exhibition of the ICP-Bard MFA Program in Advanced Photographic Studies class of 2015.

Opening Reception: Tuesday, July 7, 2015 | 6 – 8pm
Exhibition: July 7th–30th

Advanced Master Remix features work selected from the solo thesis exhibitions of the 2015 graduates of ICP-Bard’s MFA in Advanced Photographic Studies, as well as recent work, and new, site-specific installations. This remix highlights the multidisciplinary work of these artists, for whom the photographic image is a starting point, though not always the endpoint.

Photography today is the torrent that carries us, and a language we all speak. Undertaking “Advanced Photographic Studies,” then, is a more complex endeavor than ever, and the work of these newly-minted MFAs represents the new ways in which the image can be interrogated and reinterpreted.

Artists: Esther Boesche, Stephanie Colgan, Joseph Desler Costa, Marie Louise Omme, Kat Shannon, Marisa Sottos, Daniel Terna, Jessica Thalmann, Beau Torres, Kimberly J. Wade & Tracie Williams

ICP-Bard Group MFA Show

Daniel Terna, “Art Handler,” HD video, 24:24, 2014. Photo by Daniel Terna.

ICP-Bard Group MFA Show

ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Jessica Thalmann, “Utopos (Curtis Lecture Hall),” folded archival pigment prints, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo courtesy Daniel Terna.

Stephanie Colgan, Untitled, archival pigment prints, 36 x 22 inches, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Kat Shannon, “Exchanging Nourishment,” HD video, sound, 3:02, 2014. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Marie-Louise Omme, “Break.Sculpture,” digital video, sound, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Joseph Desler Costa, “Nine Laptops,” archival pigment print, 48 x 36 inches, 2014. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Beau Torres, Untitled, archival pigment print, 16 x 24 inches, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Tracie Williams, “Gravitational Mirage,” chromogenic prints, each 11 x 14 inches, 2014. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Tracie Williams, “My Gravity Defying Sister, Annie,” archival pigment print, 20 x 30 inches, 2014. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Esther Nila Boesche, “Five Heads,” archival pigment prints, each 11 x 8 inches, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Esther Nila Boesche, “Five Heads,” archival pigment prints, each 11 x 8 inches, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Marisa Sottos, Clockwise from top: “Open Your Heart to Me,” “Take it on the Run Baby,” “Help Yourself to Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass,” archival pigment prints, each 12 x 18 inches, 2015; Video monitor: “Love in Every Room,” HD video, sound, 4:20, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Kimberly J. Wade, “Ima Pear (For Trayvon, Eric and Michael)”, archival pigment print, fabric wallpaper, 24 x 20 inches (frame), 60 x 56 inches (with wallpaper), 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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Daniel Terna, from the series “We Buy Gold!” Titles from left to right: “Untitled (Engagement Rings),” “Untitled (Red),” “Untitled (Magenta),” “Untitled (Blue),” “Untitled (Green),” archival pigment prints, suede, each 14 x 11 inches, 2015. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

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ICP-Bard Group MFA Show “Advanced Master Remix,” at Baxter Street Camera Club of New York. Photo by Daniel Terna.

Me and You and Everyone We Know by Miranda July

Every time someone used to ask me about my dream job I would answer “Miranda July’s”. That answer always followed opinions about her work but that had nothing to do with it: I don’t want it because I like her work, I like it because I would love to be an artist who occasionally directs feature films. Oddly enough, I had never watched a film of hers. People always told me it is hard to ace both mediums, either you are a good artists or a good filmmaker, rarely both. Maybe my reluctance to watch one of her films came from a place of uncertainty: she symbolized my hope of everyone being wrong, and I didn’t want to be proven otherwise.

Sadly, in this case, this is partly true.

This film is a brilliant as it is faulty. With great photography, this narrative-loose film ends up being a boy-meets-girl told in an odd Miranda July way. The main issue of the film is that it is trying to tell a story: this piece would be great if only it was poetry and not prose. There are beautiful, subtle, powerful and even funny parts of the film that take advantage of the film language to exist; snippets of poetry embed in every day life that function as metaphors of the character’s state of mind, fueled by sound, movement, images and acting.

July fails in fitting this beautiful nonsense into the box of sensical drama.

Towards the end, there is a scene in which of the characters asks another one why is he doing what he’s doing, and he says just to pass the time. The film works best when it shows scenes that don’t help the development of the story at all. I’d rather just scrap the narrative altogether: I’d rather think “oh, so this is about nothing” than to think “So, they end up together, of course”. I’d rather have an emotional poem about passing time.

Fun

The first year of grad school is over. I’ve spent the last three weeks in culture shock, trying to figure out how to live at a slower pace.

My goal for the summer was to focus myself, to teach myself things I’ve been aching to learn. The plan is to make myself smarter and find a clear idea of what I want to be when I grow up.

Whenever I’m idle, a big sense of anxiety hits me. I always need to be doing something, to be productive and make the most of my time. Therefore, when I was given the assignment to blog about “the fun I’m having” once a week, every week, I wasn’t enthused. I was up for the challenge… but definitely not excited.

When I think about having fun… I think about being on a roller coaster, about traveling, or going away. Fun means completely letting go.

So my challenge for the next few weeks is, where can I find fun in the everyday? How can I find it in the quiet and unexpected moments? My task is to reflect on my week and take note of the moments I feel free, the deep laughs, and moments of joy.