Bard-ICP MFA on and off the wall

Congratulations to Bard-ICP MFA classmates, alumni, and peers selected for Klompching Gallery and BAXTER ST Camera Club summer shows. 

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the wall/the page/the internet
FRESH 2015
Exhibition Dates: July 8–August 1, 2015
Artist Reception: July 8th, 6:00–8:00pm

FRESH 2015 expands across the wall, the page and the internet—by showcasing the five photographers; Matthew Arnold, Bill Durgin, Ima Mfon, Johanna Warwick, Kimberly Withal, in the following ways:

THE WALL with an exhibition at the Klompching Gallery
THE PAGE by being featured in BLINK magazine
THE INTERNET with an online interview in At Length Mag
In addition to the exhibition, Klompching Gallery is showcasing photographs by the following 10 short-listed FRESH 2015 photographers on the gallery’s website: Chris Bennett, Frank Diaz & Deb Young, Mark Dorf, Rhea Karam, Bear Kirkpatrick, William LeGoullon, Peter Leighton, Theresa Ortolani (Bard-ICP 2016), Liz Steketee, and David Wolf

www.klompching.com

89 Water Street

BrooklynNY  11201

A U G U S T  15  –> S E P T E M B E R  4
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EXHIBITION: August 15 – September 4, 2015
Opening Reception: August 15, 2015, 6 – 8 pm

BAXTER ST at CCNY is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2015 Annual Juried Photography Competition and an upcoming exhibition featuring the top three competition artists, juried by writer and curator Marvin Heiferman. The three top winners – First Place Winner Rehan Miskci, Second Place Winner Daniel Terna (Bard-ICP 2015), and Third Place Winner Joseph Desler Costa (Bard-ICP 2015) offer three different but cohesive visions of contemporary photographic practice.

In addition to the exhibition, the winners will also have their work shown on the CCNY website from July 2015 on. Joining their work on the website will be work from fifteen Honorable Mentions artists.

Honorable Mention Artists: Matthew Arnold, Yael Eban, Lisa Fairstein, Daniel Farnum, Hugo Fernandes, Yoav Friedlander, Ivana Larrosa (Bard-ICP 2016), Jake McNulty, Laura Noel, Eleanor Oakes, Ke Peng, Christopher Rodriguez, Liz Sales (Bard-ICP 2010), Tiffany Smith, Judith Stenneken

BAXTER ST
Camera Club of NY
126 Baxter Street
New York, NY 10013

http://www.baxterst.org

ICP en VOGUE

VogueAllessia Glaviano – Senior Photo Editor at Vogue Italia and L’Uomo Vogue:  I’m often asked by emerging and aspiring photographers to suggest where would be better for them to study photography, so I thought it would be helpful to collect Editors and Curators’ advices and tips.

Chiara Bardelli Nonino – Photo Editor, Vogue Italia

• ENSP – Ecole Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie, Arles – a very solid program
• écal – Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne, Switzerland – at the forefront of photography practice
• Cfp Bauer, Milan, Italy
• Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA – Probably the best fine art department in the world; the renowned critiques have formed some of the most interesting photographers around
• RCA – Royal College of Art, London, UK – The RCA graduate show is always an unmissable appointment and the quality of the work is always top-notch
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA – strong in photojournalism
• SVA – School of Visual Arts, New York, USA
• Parsons – The New School for Design, New York, USA
• SFAI – San Francisco Art Institute, USA

Lars Boering – Managing Director at World Press Photo

• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA – it’s still strong and important
• University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hanover, Germany

Eloisa d’Orsi – Education manager at Camera – Centro Italiano per la Fotografia, Turin
• ENSP – Ecole Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie, Arles
• RCA – Royal College of Art, London, UK
• Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA
• ISSP – International Summer School of Photography, Latvia: one of the best for me. This year the teachers were: Jim Goldberg, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Anna Fox, Alexander Gronsky, Takashi Homma plus a bookmaking class by Akina books & Nico Baumgarten!
• Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA – The lecturers list is impressive to say the least: Paul Graham, Gregory Crewdson, Benjamin Donaldson, Roe Ethridge, Kate Greene, Melissa Harris, Curran Hatleberg, Roni Horn, Lisa Kereszi, Roxana Marcoci, Lesley Martin, Meredith Miller,  Rick Moody, Laurel Nakadate, Arthur Ou, Jack Pierson, John Pilson, Richard Prince, Collier Schorr, Martha Schwendener, Lorna Simpson, Nancy Spector, Ka-Man Tse, Philip-Lorca diCorcia
• The Rodchenko Art School, Moscow, Russia – part of the Multimedia Centre of Actual Arts

Alice Gabriner – International Photo Editor at Time

The best workshop or educational experience depends on who is teaching and who the mentor is. If I were a young photographer looking to learn, I would find a photographer whose work I like and then try to do a workshop with him/her. People I’ve heard are very good teachers include: Jeff Jacobson, Christopher Morris, Antonin Kratochvil, Eugene Richards, Maggie Steber and David Alan Harvey. I would contact Magnum and look to see who is teaching and then start that way. I would be careful that the teacher/professional has more than a few years experience. Since photography is an abstract, subjective experience, I would want to find a teacher/program that fits my approach and needs. Most young photographers like The Eddie Adams Workshop: it can be a great way to meet other young photographers and experienced professionals, and could be an important launching pad. Of course the Master Class is supposed to be a special experience – mainly, from what I hear, because of the relationships that are formed with other photographers. In Perpignan, they now offer the transmissions workshop which I will be doing this year with Christopher Morris, João Silva, and Stephan Vanfleteren. OSF sometimes has workshops and they are quite good, as does the Magnum Emergency Fund. Some good schools for photography in the US are (this is far from complete):
• Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
• Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA (for photojournalism—graduates like Matt Eich)
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA
• Hartford Art School, Connecticut, USA
• Columbia College Chicago, USA

Alessia Glaviano – Senior Photo Editor, Vogue Italia and L’Uomo Vogue

• World Press Photo Academy – it has an important educational role with its The Joop Swart Masterclass, an autoritative and established format with partnership all over the world.
• Parsons – The New School for Design, New York, USA
• RCA – Royal College of Art, London, UK
• CSM – Central Saint Martins
• Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA
• Magnum – An impressive list of courses and workshops, it’s important to periodically check the education section
• Camera – Centro Italiano per la Fotografia, Turin, Italy – I am confident that this center will do an amazing work. On the educational side they are developing a series of workshops in collaboration with Leica Akademie and Magnum Photos
• Linke.lab, Milan, Italy: Linke has organized many interesting workshops in the last years, among others: Rob Hornstra, Stanley Greene, Teun Van der Heijden, George Georghiu. Upcoming there is a workshop in Sarajevo on July 10-14 to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the end of the war in Bosnia, with photographer Ziyah Gafic, author of the project ‘Quest for Identity’ and Ted fellow and Paul Lowe, Course Director MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography, London College of Communication.
• Micamera, Milan, Italy: they always held interesting, good quality workshops, such as: Mark Steinmetz, Anders Petersen, Lucas Foglia, Joakim Eskildsen, Michael Ackerman, Todd Hido

Manik Katyal – Editor-in-Chief, Emaho Magazine

• IED, Madrid, Spain – Has very impressive list of mentors and courses.
• London School of Communication, London, UK – Has a very interesting masters course.
• Pathshala, Bangladesh Has produced some very important photographers from this part of the world.
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA

Fred Ritchin – Photo editor, Curator, Professor and Dean of the School at ICP

• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA – As Dean of the School at the International Center of Photography, it is obvious that this would be my choice. We have intensive one-year full-time programs in New Media Narratives, General Studies, Documentary and Photojournalism, as well as a 2-year MFA in Photography. And we have many Continuing Education courses for adults, both weekend workshops and longer courses up to ten weeks. We have more than 4,000 students.

James Wellford – Photo editor, Curator, Former International Photo Editor at Newsweek

• The Eddie Adams Workshop – For workshops, I think the Eddie Adams in upstate NY is a game changer. The list of photographers who have passed through this trial by fire speaks for itself and the draw of established and creative photographers is always impressive
• ICP – International Center of Photography, New York, USA – The International Center of Photography as well is excellent and again many fine photographers have graced its halls. ICP is prohibitively expensive as so many schools in the US are, but if photographers are able to figure out a way to manage the expenses, they usually benefit from the experience
• University of Missouri, Columbia, USA
• Maine Media Workshop, Rockport, Maine, USA – I don’t have first hand experience but many say the the University of Missouri and Maine workshops have real value
• Ohio University – Ohio University and again the University of Missouri have strong programs
• SVA – School of Visual Arts, New York, USA – Also a strong program under Charles Traub
• Columbia University, School of the Arts, New York, USA – Also a strong program under Thomas Roma

Excerpted from an article published by: ALESSIA GLAVIANO06/23/2015 See the comprehensive list in VOGUE ITALIA

Theresa Ortolani : Klompching Gallery FRESH 2015 Finalist

I am honored to have been selected among Klompching Gallery’s FRESH 2015 Finalists.

DECOMPOSED explores the systems and boundaries between binaries – image/text, conscious/unconscious, corporeal/spiritual – and focuses on the points at which these constructs converge, invert and decompose.

These primarily lens-based images were crafted via various techniques: masking, piercing, sewing, drawing, digital imaging, and printed in multiple layers. The original works vary in size, medium and technique. The final pieces were then reproduced, Glicée printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag and also included in a handmade, limited edition 7 x 7 inch, 50 plate artist book.

DECOMPOSED No. 1 97% 2015 Tape, Colored Pencil 24 x 32 inches, Wall Drawing 12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag ©Theresa Ortolani

DECOMPOSED No. 1
97%
Tape, Colored Pencil
24 x 32 inches, Wall Drawing
12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
©Theresa Ortolani 2015

DECOMPOSED No. 18 Red 2015 12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag ©Theresa Ortolani

DECOMPOSED No. 18
Red
12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
©Theresa Ortolani 2015

DECOMPOSED No. 21 Blue 12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag ©Theresa Ortolani 2015

DECOMPOSED No. 21
Blue
12 x 12 inches, Glicée on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
©Theresa Ortolani 2015

V e n d i n g ˚ S h i f t | Ellen Jong

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NYC artist Ellen Jong photographed herself urinating around the world for over a decade. The images were first introduced in 2000 by Vice Magazine, and she received art world acclaim with the publication of her first monograph, Pees on Earth (miss rosen edition/powerHouse Books, 2006). She subsequently developed a mixed media practice that has allowed her to continue exploring body, gender, discovery and conflict.

_800x544_jong-ellen-01Jong is also the author of the artist book, Getting To Know My Husband’s Cock (self-published 2010 / d.a.p) which was exhibited in her solo show The Invisible Line at Allegra LaViola in 2012. The exhibit received a rave review by Vince Aletti in The New Yorker. The book was featured on SPBH and selected by Alec Soth as a top ten self-published photo book.ellen-jong-getting-to-know-my-husband-s-cock-1At the center of Jong’s upcoming Vending Shift exhibit, an installation of six yellow neon tubes suspended from the ceiling will cascade to the floor. As the work evokes both flame and bodily fluid (urine), Jong will command the room with a yellow glow, reminding viewers of the fire and water in us all._DSC2361The phrase “Peeness Envy” emerged from Jong’s lips like a Freudian slip in describing her work’s aim of taking the “penis out of envy.”

To illustrate the Freudian theory of Penis Envy, the psychoanalyst developed an image of a fire pit surrounded by men attempting to extinguish the flames with their own urine. The first man to do this successfully would harness a fiery power. According to Freud, women were only capable of nurturing the fire. Jong’s show is a public invitation to subvert Freud’s assertions and encourage a new understanding of the metaphorical fire.

tbAJoZDM2gNcgX8uTvCsfwHoXPwqW0JxcRcBQmvQ1t4Vending Shift is an independent, raw presentation of art making, sharing, selling and discovery, introducing Peeness Envy wearables. The “Vending Shift” pop-up show is a statement on survival. Caps, tees, jeans, and sweatshirts will be available for purchase for the duration of the exhibition.

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Opening Reception Thursday June 11 | 6 – 9 pm | Performance by Legacy Fatale 8 pm

Thursday, June 17, Jong furthers the “Peenis Envy” conversation by transforming her solo show into a salon style group exhibit. Artists to be announced on June 11

Gallery Sensei 278 Grand Street 2nd floor

Me and You and Everyone We Know by Miranda July

Every time someone used to ask me about my dream job I would answer “Miranda July’s”. That answer always followed opinions about her work but that had nothing to do with it: I don’t want it because I like her work, I like it because I would love to be an artist who occasionally directs feature films. Oddly enough, I had never watched a film of hers. People always told me it is hard to ace both mediums, either you are a good artists or a good filmmaker, rarely both. Maybe my reluctance to watch one of her films came from a place of uncertainty: she symbolized my hope of everyone being wrong, and I didn’t want to be proven otherwise.

Sadly, in this case, this is partly true.

This film is a brilliant as it is faulty. With great photography, this narrative-loose film ends up being a boy-meets-girl told in an odd Miranda July way. The main issue of the film is that it is trying to tell a story: this piece would be great if only it was poetry and not prose. There are beautiful, subtle, powerful and even funny parts of the film that take advantage of the film language to exist; snippets of poetry embed in every day life that function as metaphors of the character’s state of mind, fueled by sound, movement, images and acting.

July fails in fitting this beautiful nonsense into the box of sensical drama.

Towards the end, there is a scene in which of the characters asks another one why is he doing what he’s doing, and he says just to pass the time. The film works best when it shows scenes that don’t help the development of the story at all. I’d rather just scrap the narrative altogether: I’d rather think “oh, so this is about nothing” than to think “So, they end up together, of course”. I’d rather have an emotional poem about passing time.